Wednesday, 8 February 2017

Scent your home with flowers - a post for the green fingered.



£48. That’s how much it costs to scent your home with Diptyque’s beautiful Rosa Mundi candle. If it’s the middle of winter, or you live in a flat and have money to burn (literally) I understand the desire to buy this object of loveliness.

However, £48 buys a hell of a lot of real flowers. Not the rubbish ones that don’t smell of anything from the florist, I’m talking about growing your own.

Last May I moved from my sky high urban flat to an old Victorian terraced cottage. It’s tiny and a little bit knackered, but there is a garden. As the proud owner of green fingers I couldn’t wait to plan my much missed outdoor space. I have only a miniscule front garden, South facing and elevated from the lane by rickety stone steps.  Its patio area is just big enough for a few planters and a deck chair from which I can tipple gin in the summer. At the rear of the house is a yard filled by an old outdoor toilet shed. I plan to sow a ‘cut flower’ patch in grow bags upon its roof when the sun rises high enough to battle for daylight dominance with the neighbouring woods.

The garden was a mess, an overgrown patch of shrubs that had never seen a blade and waist high grass on a mission to self-seed dandelion clocks and sadistic thistles. My determined Dad spent several hours ‘strimming’ the grass, pausing every few minutes to rethread the machine as its exhausted cord broke repeatedly. Meanwhile I destroyed my back digging up a plethora of eye pokingly sharp cordyline plants. I have a fear of spikes…

Hardcore strimming event

Whilst it was too late in the season to grow many seeds, I couldn’t resist giving life to some sweet peas. I spent 99p on a packet of ‘Spencer Mixed’ variety which by August grew into a 5 foot high pot of scented glory. For the next couple of months my house was filled with their intoxicating fragrance and I slept soundly lulled by bedside vases of this frilly wonder.

My Mum divided her old fashioned carnation plants and gave me clumps to plant up by the patio. If you’ve never smelt a garden grown carnation you will be astounded by its peppery floral fragrance. Imagine a Caron boutique in the 1950s and that’s about it. They smell exactly like Bellodgia. A single bloom can fill a room with a strident Oeillet olé such is its bold exuberance!

Carnation and Sweat Pea Spencer Mixed spicing up the dining table

The neglected white Rosa Alba that lived here had bolted to a giant straggle. Although a few Dior-esque petals remained it needed lopping almost to the ground to encourage healthy new growth next year. Meanwhile I headed to the garden centre and chose a David Austin ‘Generous Gardener’ climbing rose to satisfy my craving. Chosen for its scent, this pink beauty smells like the finest Rose Damascena absolute with a teeny hint of sugared almond. Sadly I knocked its heavily budded head off in a clumsy car exit but it rapidly grew back.

My Generous Gardener in full bloom

My plans for 2017

It will be a summer of vivid scented annual flowers. My ‘Spencer Mixed’ sweet peas are growing vigorously. In October I transformed a worn out G-Plan side table into a miniature bubble wrapped greenhouse to see if it really is possible to ‘overwinter’ annual seedlings in the cold damp Pennine winter. It is. In May I will plant a second variety ‘Sweet Pea Promise’ – a posh one from Thompson and Morgan that promises to be hugely whiffy.


G-Plan greenhouse


Sweat Pea Promise from the Thompson and Morgan website

Early flowering scent will come from Stocks ‘Appleblossom’. Stocks have a heady narcotic whiff, which with just a few stems is intoxicating. More than a few is a whopping migraine.

                                          Stocks Appleblossom from the Thompson and Morgan website

My perennial white Phlox plants will hopefully reawaken and battle the slugs to bring some elegance once again. Their scent is a marvelous combination of the skanky indole that we devour in our white floral fragrances and a more delicate and fresh green nuance that brings brightness and vivacity and makes the plant smell ‘youthful’.

Phlox

Some shrubs inherited from the previous owners have proved to be seasonally boring. They will be dug up and replaced by lavender, the foliage of which will make an excellent 'leafy bit' in my indoor arrangements. 

Last year I waged war on slugs. I had millions of the little thugs. With Joseph and his neighbouring cat friends around, the use of toxins was not a possibility. This year I’m conducting an experiment. I am collecting my own hair in order to create hairy rings around the base of tender seedlings. I never brush it so a hair wash yields lots of useful strands! Apparently slugs hate the dry texture of hair and wool and won’t cross it. The witchy side of me loves the idea of having a part of myself lurking sentinel like in the garden. My grandmother would have approved of this frugal and somewhat pagan approach.

Joseph strolls his territory wall

I’ll post an update in early summer and let you know which plants yield the greatest fragrance. I would dearly love to hear from any of my readers who tend a fragrant garden. Your recommendations would be gratefully received in the comments box.

To ensure that you never miss a piece of my fragrant waffle why not use the 'subscribe' box on the right hand side. Feedburner will send you a link asking for confirmation of your request, Alternatively, hit like at:

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Estee Lauder - Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia, gateway to a new me

January is a bleak month for those of us residing in Northern Europe. It’s chilly, the days are diminutive, and we crave the onset of the light and energy delivered by Spring. Following the excited delights of the pre-Christmas credit card binge that is ‘Black Friday and Cyber Monday’, January brings us ‘Blue Monday’, rumoured to be the most depressing day of the year.

January in the North, a bleak etching I created in 2009

It’s not all blue though. January often gives us an opportunity to make personal changes. We are more likely to ditch an overly stressful job, rethink our personal goals or make good on our seasonal gluttony and get healthy. Although I didn’t make a list of New Year resolutions (I’d inevitably break them), I definitely feel a positive force for change.

With this in mind, I’m shedding some flab.

I’m not obese, just a bit podgy. An auf wiedersehen to half a stone would set me free to wear my favourite ‘brilliant arse’ jeans that lie forlornly at the bottom of my thin clothes drawer. It wasn’t really Christmas that piled on the pounds, more the proximity of a work canteen that sells fabulous sausage rolls and the forgiving nature of winter clothing. It just crept on.

My diet is not strict, I’m simply cutting down on the usual adversaries; booze, sugar, cheese and the occasional foray into pies. Vaguely based on Slimming World but without the culinary dreadfulness that is 1 calorie cooking spray and Quark.

I took a jaunt to the January sales and purposefully left tight fitting clothes well alone, I’d already dropped a couple of pounds and was excited at the prospect of delving into my thin clothes drawer in the near future, no point buying new ones. However, in the sale I found an ideal motivator. Nestling amongst the Estee Lauder counter’s sale shelf was a discounted purse spray of Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia. I bought it, took it home, and promptly decorated the package with a chastising post-it note. I will not unwrap and spray the perfume until I get half way through the diet. It will be freed from it’s bondage when the scales display 10 stone 6. As I write this, I’m 1 pound away. Tomorrow might be the day.

Motivation

Ironically, Tuberose Gardenia is a fulsome fatty scent, the fragrance equivalent of one of those delicious custard pastries that accompany your Espresso in a Parisian café. A Gardenia petal is firm and waxy to the touch, clustered tightly in a heavy globe, there’s no frailness here. It’s a voluptuous flower. Tuberose is often likened to the scent of bacon fat, as rancid and corpulent as it is beautiful.  In Tuberose Gardenia, the Lauder labs have synthesised the concept of gargantuan white flower decadence. If it were a woman, she would not be thin.

The Gardenia flower

10 stone 6 will mark the occasion of the first ‘well done you’ spray. From that point it will be consigned to the fabulous arse/thin clothes drawer. It won’t be properly allowed out until those jeans fit. By this I mean that I can actually sit down in them without the zip bursting or instigating the onset of bleeding from my kidneys.


By then it will be spring. And I’ll burst into fragrant flower as the narcissus in my garden open their faces to greet the sun.